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‘Tis the Season to be Scammed

scam

It was just yesterday that most of the world was in lockdown, then today we look up and it is half way through November 2023. It sometimes feels like 3 years have been condensed into 1.

The Rolling Stones just released a new album, The Beatles have released a new song & both rushed to the top of the charts - it appears that history continues to repeat itself.

I will not go on about all the things that have changed, or the increased number of cyber attacks or improvements to cyber criminals methods, I will rather focus this article on the things that keep coming back, end of year scams.

While we wait in anticipation of the shopping frenzy that is Black Friday around the world and deal with the festive specials and Christmas music in stores (in November) keep an eye out for the #cybergrinch who will be trying to make this a year of losses.

“Do not let the cyber criminals make a bargain of your money, credentials or information this festive season.”

Attackers will also take advantage of desperation or our insatiable appetite to get the best deal. I would like to offer a few pointers to keep the #cybergrinch out of our festive spirit.

DO:

  • Make sure you are on the correct site when entering your #creds - CREDentials and/or CREDit card details - type out website & never respond to a link telling you to pay for a missed delivery or your account which is about to cancelled.
  • Verify the deal you see on Social Media is legitimate, be patient and verify before you part with money for the deal that is too good to be true.
  • Read reviews & use legitimate websites and traders where at least you will have some protection.

DON'T:

  • Click on links on email, text, WhatsApp, etc if you are not expecting them. If you did not enter the competition - you did not win it.
  • Forward unsolicited text or WhatsApp messages from "retailers" offering huge vouchers in return for 10 of your friends contact details. Just DELETE it.
  • Send gift cards as payment for goods or to a "friend" who is in trouble and needs you top up their App Store vouchers.
  • Pay a deposit for an article that you have not seen from a person you have never dealt with.
  • Enter anything into a website that you get to from a link in an unsolicited message or email.

As everything changes, many things stay the same. If a deal seems too good to be true - it probably is.

Let me know what else I missed?

If you are unsure about your business' cyber resilience program and need some guidance - #letstalk.

Stay safe.

John

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